Sago

On our Sunday drive we stopped at an Arby’s for a quick lunch. Sitting in the dining room, I was noticing the landscaping outside. What had caught my eye was the Sago Palm blooming out the window…

Cycas revoluta (sago palm, king sago, sago cycad, Japanese sago palm), is a species of gymnosperm in the family Cycadaceae, native to southern Japan including the Ryukyu Islands. It is one of several species used for the production of sago, as well as an ornamental plant.

via Cycas revoluta – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

 

Sago Palm
click on the photo for a larger view…

One thing I didn’t realize was the toxicity of these plants…

Cycad sago is extremely poisonous to animals (including humans) if ingested. Pets are at particular risk, since they seem to find the plant very palatable.[10] Clinical symptoms of ingestion will develop within 12 hours, and may include vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, seizures, and liver failure or hepatotoxicity characterized by icterus, cirrhosis, and ascites. The pet may appear bruised, have nose bleeds (epistaxis), melena (blood in the stool), hematochezia (bloody straining), and hemarthrosis (blood in the joints).[11] The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center estimates a fatality rate of 50 to 75% when ingestion of the sago palm is involved. The incidence of ingestion by pets has risen by over 200% in the last five years.[12] If any quantity of the plant is ingested, a poison control center or doctor should be contacted immediately. Effects of ingestion can include permanent internal damage and death.

All parts of the plant are toxic; however, the seeds contain the highest level of the toxin cycasin. Cycasin causes gastrointestinal irritation, and in high enough doses, leads to liver failure.[13] Other toxins include Beta-methylamino L-alanine, a neurotoxic amino acid, and an unidentified toxin which has been observed to cause hindlimb paralysis in cattle.[14]

via Cycas revoluta – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

 

Sago Palm II
click on the photo for a larger view…

All of these photos are of the male strobilus. There were no female plants in the garden…

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